Posted by: medicblog999 | November 12, 2010

Episode 3 of Ambulance Matters Podcast, now Live!

The latest installment of the UK’s first EMS Podcast is now available to download over at www.ambulancematters.com

In this episode, we discuss the Darlington Police/Paramedic Project.

I am joined by guests from the UK and the US to discuss this innovation in services working together and the potential benefits that it can bring to the emergency care provided to the community of a busy town or city over the usual party hours of a Friday and Saturday night.

I will hopefully be moving the podcast to iTunes over the next couple of weeks, so it wont be long until you will be able to subscribe in iTunes

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Responses

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Shari Simpson, Chronicles of EMS. Chronicles of EMS said: Episode 3 of Ambulance Matters Podcast, now Live! http://bit.ly/ajUAhD Via @Medic999 #CoEMS […]

  2. Interesting discussion, sounds like a very interesting project that could be clearly demonstrated to have benefits for all organisations involved.

    The remarks about maintaining neutrality relate to quite a difficult topic. I would agree for the vast majority of cases that the medic should hang back if the police are dealing with a violent situation, they are neither trained nor do they wish to tarnish their impartial viewpoint. However if it was all going pete tong and the police officers were in serious trouble I would like to think that a medic, the MP etc would assist as per basic human decency to colleagues.

    Also on a point of law it can actually be an offence to refuse to assist a police officer quell a disturbance without reasonable excuse, see:

    http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/p_to_r/public_justice_offences_incorporating_the_charging_standard/#Refusing_to_Assist

    Obviously it would never normally be in the public interest but it could leave individuals open if the police officer asked for assistance when it was going horribly wrong, a medic refused and the officer ended up seriously injured. Although in practical terms this would likely cause bad blood and could cause potential issues with people refusing to work together again.

  3. I’m very impressed with the way this is going, great topic choice, with an excellent panel.

    I might have missed it in the conversation, or another blog post, but what would you say the average split of calls is? How many require your intervention, how many are purely civilian police actions, and how many is the RMP officer required for?

    Keep up the good work, and stay safe!


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