Posted by: medicblog999 | April 7, 2010

Hampshire Fire and Rescue LODD

hampshire_fire

I woke this morning to hear the terrible news that two of our Fire Fighter brothers had perished in a large building fire on Tuesday. James Shears (35) and Alan Bannan (38) from Red Watch at St Marys station in Southampton,  died at the 15-storey Shirley Towers in Church Street where fire broke out just after 2000 BST on Tuesday.

Details are vague at the moment, but I guess that right now details don’t matter; only the fact the two lives have been lost whilst performing their own duty to save life and property.

Fortunately Fire Fighter fatalities don’t happen that often in the UK, however there have been more than any one would wish for in recent years (1 is too many)

The details will come out after the inquiry that will take place.There may be things to learn from this or it may well just be a terrible accident that no one could have foreseen.

There have been a couple of news stories covering this and can be viewed here along with two video reports.

As you all know, I’m not a fire fighter and do not understand the intricacies of fighting any type of fire, let alone one on this scale. I have commented in the past how I am quite happy to respond to fires and stay well out of the way until the Brigade has made it safe for me to tend to any casualties or indeed bring them to me.

In this case, South Central Ambulance Service who covers Hampshire responded to the scene as a major incident and worked closely  alongside Hampshire Fire and Rescue at the scene. SCAS has placed the a statement on their website to explain the events of the evening in question. That report can be read here.

What we can all be sure of is that the Fire Fighters were given the best possible care on scene and en route to A&E.

Today is a time for sharing that bond that we all have in the emergency services and show compassion, thoughts and prayers for the families of the two fallen.

We do not have the same structures in place for Line of Duty deaths that our colleagues do in the USA. It would be fantastic if we never had to concern ourselves with such things, but the UK could learn a thing or two from the USA about respecting and recognising the sacrifices that some give in the service of others (outside of the UK Fire Service).

There has always been a love hate relationship between the Fire and Ambulance service in the UK, but all of that fades away when things like this happen. They are our brothers and sisters, and they deserve our respect for the risks that they put themselves at when the call does come in.

But for now, please join me in a moment of reflection and thought.

Rest in Peace.

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Responses

  1. Deepest condolences to the families, friends and colleagues of those who have lost their lives.Nick.

  2. Nicely written post, Mark. My thoughts and prayers to those that have given the ultimate sacrifice, their family, friends and colleagues, as well…

  3. Regardless of where it happens, a LODD touches everyone and reminds us all of the sacrifices emergency responders make and the dangers they face. May our thoughts and prayers help bring peace to their families, friends, brothers and sisters in public service.Their sacrifice will not be forgotten.

  4. I'm sorry to hear of any of our brothers losing their lives in the line of duty.My heart is with their families.Lt James RosseSouth Schodack Fire

  5. Great post, Mark.May our fallen brothers rest in peace.

  6. I was on youtube and I came accross this video, the lyrics and some of the images almost moved me to tears. It shows the ultimate sacrifice that firefighters make by doing their jobs. RIP to all firefighters who have died in the line of duty. A link to the video is below.

  7. I was on youtube and I came accross this video, the lyrics and some of the images almost moved me to tears. It shows the ultimate sacrifice that firefighters make by doing their jobs. RIP to all firefighters who have died in the line of duty. A link to the video is below.


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