Posted by: medicblog999 | April 1, 2010

Wouldnt it be great if……

cctvFollowing on from my recent post ‘Real or Fake’, one of my readers left a comment linking to  short video taken from a UK Police fly on the wall documentary.

It really has to be seen to be believed what this ‘patient’ did to get a police and ambulance response, not to mention the waste of time for the A&E Department.

And the best thing of all is that it is all caught on CCTV before the initial call was made.

Take a seat for the next 10 minutes, sit back and relax whilst you wish that we had this facility for all of the calls that we run.

Thanks to Lisa for sending me the link!

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Responses

  1. Hello Mark,I have only ever commented on your blog once before and that was on the old site. I only ever write a comment when I feel strongly about an issue you have highlighted in your post and as for the boy who faked a hit and run in this video, I think it is absolutely disgraceful and I believe he should have been forced to pay the ambulance crew and the police officers for wasting their time. After all there are seriously ill and injured people who require urgent help from paramedics and help may be delayed as a result of people such as the boy faking an injury. I think this is absoulutely disgraceful and I also think it is just as serious as making a hoax call. Does anyone else agree with me?

  2. I actually had to view this twice as I thought it was so unbelievable and what a great coincidence there was CCTV just next to the scene. Can't believe he kept denying after the cop had caught him out and confronted him with clear evidence. There is a mental disease pattern which crossed my mind immediately: munchausen's syndrome. We once had a young lady who insisted on having right sided abdominal pain 10/10. She reported a history of ovarian cysts and had had almost a dozen operations in the past with scars all over her abdomen. She was very tender and “guarding” with a temperature of 38.5, a high BP and raised pulse, all signs of genuine pain and a possible infection so she ended up in resus due to her obs and high pain score. I think she had already been scheduled for a laparoscopy when suddenly she insisted on “talking to someone in private” and admitted to having taken different kind of medications in order to alter her test results and raise her BP/temperature/pulse. Usually munchausen patients hardly ever do that but in THIS case the amount of drugs taken plus the 20mg of morphine she got for pain relief in A&E and the “gas'n air” had led to a type of “paranoia” where she was so out of it, she completely panicked and admitted to all of it before fleeing the hospital.I'm sure many of us have encountered these kind of patients without even noticing as most of them are brilliant actors and perfect liars. They also tend to know a lot about medicine and the display of their illnesses/symptoms. The damage they cause by their actions is horrendous and it is very hard to prosecute them once they've been caught. “Munchausen's syndrome is a rare psychological and behavioural condition in which somebody fabricates or induces symptoms of illness in themselves.People with Munchausen's syndrome typically display a set pattern of behaviour. This pattern includes: * lying about their symptoms and typically also lying about other aspects of their life, such as their past or level of education, * manipulating test results to suggest the presence of symptoms, such as adding blood to urine samples, * actually inflicting symptoms on themselves, such as poisoning themselves with an overdose of medication, and * travelling from hospital to hospital in different parts of the country, and seeing many different doctors.” (NHS website)

  3. It is a sad indictment of a cossetted, and careless society.Fortunately, when I served on the ambulances some years ago the abuse was relatively uncommon. If I thought any of my sprogs, and grandsprogs behaved in a similer fashion my ire would know no bounds.The dad and police officer behaved in my view with remarkable restraint.

  4. I don't know if they do this in the UK, but in many cities here, whenever a mass transit bus gets into a traffic accident, they lock the doors until police arrive, because people often board the bus after the fact and claim injury.I once worked a rollover wreck involving a van where we transported 14 victims. Turns out only 11 were aboard the van, and the other 3 walked down the hill from the public housing complex and lay in the ditch, faking injuries.

  5. That's clearly an “American” problem. A friend of mine decided to move to the U.S. 5 years ago. He's a surgeon and the first thing he says he learned is: “Whatever you do, whoever you deal with, what you don't want is a lawsuit”I considered that possibility after watching the videolink, but if it's compensation the bloke was after, than he's got two problems: 1. He's in the UK and 2. There was no offender – even though he says he “saw it in his head”, there was NO CAR *lol*(My guess is still munchausen's syndrome)

  6. That's clearly an “American” problem. A friend of mine decided to move to the U.S. 5 years ago. He's a surgeon and the first thing he says he learned is: “Whatever you do, whoever you deal with, what you don't want is a lawsuit”I considered that possibility after watching the videolink, but if it's compensation the bloke was after, than he's got two problems: 1. He's in the UK and 2. There was no offender – even though he says he “saw it in his head”, there was NO CAR *lol*(My guess is still munchausen's syndrome)


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