Posted by: medicblog999 | March 10, 2010

A Message from one of my readers….

1147437_email_iconAgain, one of my readers has made me start my day with a smile, a spring in my step and also a lump in my throat.

As I checked my emails once I had got Josh off to school, this one popped up with a message title of ‘Thanks’. I didn’t recognise the sender, but was intriqued to read on.

What follows is the email, which needs to be shared with all of us in this wonderful EMS Blogosphere. I hope it makes you feel as special as it did me, and even though we will never know who that medic was, we should all be grateful to him also, for being such an ambassador for our profession.

Enjoy….

Dear Mark,

This is a thank you letter, even though we don’t know each other and have never met.

Forty-five years ago my paternal grandmother had a heart attack. She died and my father was left without a mother. Ten years ago my father had a heart attack; I was fourteen and my brother was six. Even though I was at the age of teenage rebellion and angst, I still adored my dad: he could use the quadratic equation (in my maths homework!), dive from the highest diving board, make jokes my friends would laugh at. I remember waiting by the front door for the ambulance my mum had called, thinking Who else knows so much? Who else would I ask?

This story has a happy ending –  my father has a stent in his heart and I have dad in my life. I do not know what treatment the emergency crew gave my dad that day – and I think it must have been complicated by the little I am aware of – but what I do recall is this: before they left, one put a hand on my shoulder and said, “We’ll take care of him”. He looked me in the eye and meant it. A stranger to me was saying, I understand he is precious to you, I take on that responsibility. Partly because of him, that episode in my life is a dropped stitch, neatly mended, and not a torn, gaping, irrevocable hole.

Since that day, my family has been together to the Grand Canyon; my dad has seen me graduate from university and start my first job; we have screamed with joy at the TV when England won the rugby world cup. I still call at least once a week for advice. We fight. In short, we are a family.

I never said a proper thank you to that ambulance crew – which I feel very guilty about now – so maybe I can say an open thank you to you (and your readers if you wish). Thank you for your knowledge, compassion and responsibility. Thank you for being there when others are not. Thank you, specifically, for knitting together my family’s future.

Yours, with great sincerity,

Rebecca

So, from all of us Paramedics, thank you Rebecca. It means a whole lot to us to hear this sort of thing. You will have touched many of us with this, and will have given alot of people a lift with your sentiments.

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Responses

  1. That's one powerful letter!

  2. Fast tracking patient's to the Cath Labs and visiting them afterwards in CCU is one of my favourite activities…From pale, clammy and asking you if they are going to die every 5 minutes to relaxed, pain free and comfortable…it gets me through the abusive drunks with a cut finger!

  3. My thoughts exactly! Not much else to say except for taking the time to thank the first responders…even if you don't know the exact ones who helped. I like to think that I have helped someone and touched their hearts as those medics did for you…Thanks are always appreciated.

  4. Thanks for posting Mark & thanks for your letter Rebecca.There's lot's of times we bring a sick or injured parent out of the house with scared, stunned and silent kid/s at the door watching. I always give words of comfort to those kids because I know it's a big moment in their lives and they are afraid. It's good to hear your family's happy ending to the story, & thanks for taking the time to thank the folks that helped that day.

  5. You guys ARE special!Recently, my husband (who is insulin dependent) had a severe hypo in the small hours of the morning. Normally, I would manage him single-handed, but this time I knew immediately that he was worse than usual. He had also become hypothermic (although I didn't realise it at this stage) because he was lying in damp bedclothes as a result of the sweating. I called 999 – the first time I have felt the need to do so.I had a two-paramedic crew with me within five minutes, and they stayed with us for nearly an hour, until my husband was fully recovered. Although they were clearly in charge, they involved me (as much as was appropriate) in their treatment. They didn't leave until they were satisfied that I was happy for them to do so.I am a first aid trainer, and I could probably have managed on my own, but it was an enormous relief to have that crew with me – perhaps especially so because I'd been woken up, whereas they were fully awake!I did thank them, but I'd like to add my thanks to Rebecca's. Thank you, EMS folk, for being there at the worst times, and for doing all you can to make things better. I'm sure you get a real buzz when you are able to use your skills and see your patient improve – but unless you've also been the concerned relative, I don't think that you will know just how much difference your arrival makes!EMS folk are angels of a special kind!

  6. You guys ARE special!Recently, my husband (who is insulin dependent) had a severe hypo in the small hours of the morning. Normally, I would manage him single-handed, but this time I knew immediately that he was worse than usual. He had also become hypothermic (although I didn't realise it at this stage) because he was lying in damp bedclothes as a result of the sweating. I called 999 – the first time I have felt the need to do so.I had a two-paramedic crew with me within five minutes, and they stayed with us for nearly an hour, until my husband was fully recovered. Although they were clearly in charge, they involved me (as much as was appropriate) in their treatment. They didn't leave until they were satisfied that I was happy for them to do so.I am a first aid trainer, and I could probably have managed on my own, but it was an enormous relief to have that crew with me – perhaps especially so because I'd been woken up, whereas they were fully awake!I did thank them, but I'd like to add my thanks to Rebecca's. Thank you, EMS folk, for being there at the worst times, and for doing all you can to make things better. I'm sure you get a real buzz when you are able to use your skills and see your patient improve – but unless you've also been the concerned relative, I don't think that you will know just how much difference your arrival makes!EMS folk are angels of a special kind!

  7. BJ, you must be a bit special too. Number one, you know first aid. That's “special” as too few people know even the basics.Secondly, even though you are qualified and experienced, you knew when to say “Enough! I need more qualified help here.”That's real knowledge of the subject.

  8. BJ, you must be a bit special too. Number one, you know first aid. That's “special” as too few people know even the basics.Secondly, even though you are qualified and experienced, you knew when to say “Enough! I need more qualified help here.”That's real knowledge of the subject.


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